[PDF or kindle] Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies AUTHOR Jared Diamond

Review Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

Why did Eurasians conuer displace or decimate Native Americans Australians and Africans instead of the reverse In this artful informative and delightful William H McNeill New York Review of Books book a classic of our time evolutionary biologist Jared Diamond dismantles racist theories of human history by revealing the environmental factors actually responsible for its broadest patternsThe story begins 13000 years ago when Stone Age hunter gatherers constituted the entire human population Around that time the developmental p. I spent a whole semester on this book for a class and absolutely loved it100% recommend as a gift to anyone interested in this field

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Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

Aths of human societies on different continents began to diverge greatly Early domestication of wild plants and animals in the Fertile Crescent China Mesoamerica the Andes and other areas gave peoples of those regions a head start at a new way of life But the localized origins of farming and herding proved to be only part of the explanation for their differing fates The uneual rates at which food production spread from those initial centers were influenced by other features of climate and geography including the disparate si. it opened a new window for me

Jared Diamond » 9 Review

Zes locations and even shapes of the continents Only societies that moved away from the hunter gatherer stage went on to develop writing technology government and organized religions as well as deadly germs and potent weapons of war It was those societies adventuring on sea and land that invaded others decimating native inhabitants through slaughter and the spread of diseaseA major landmark in our understanding of human societies Guns Germs and Steel chronicles the way in which the modern world and its ineualities came to be. How this book managed to pass me by for the last 20 years is beyond me but it did and I was much the poorer for it I suspect it was down to the somewhat misleading subtitle Its not a short history of the world it is instead an attempt to explain why some parts of the world developed much uicker than others and how we have reached the relative balance of civilizations that we have today The core of the argument is in the title but its much complex than that and the author does an excellent job in laying out his arguments and providing the underpinning evidence for themOthers reviewers have said its a dry read Believe me its not I have read scientific journals much drier than this Inevitably some of the topics such how some plants and animals have been domesticated can be a dry topic but the author does a really good job in making the explanations easier to followThe astonishing thing about this book is that it has pulled evidence from a wide variety of sources to build up such a coherent and plausible picture The author is a genuine polymath and his masterly analysis of topics from such a wide variety of scientific and historical fields is breathtaking It was fully deserving of its Pulitzer prizeIts easy to see why this book is unpopular with some sections of society it undermines the basis of many other theories about racial cultural and religeous supremacy I am convinced however that this will be seen as one of a select few landmark books that shape the way we perceive our origins in the years to comeThe Kindle version is good conversion of the original book The diagrams can be effectively magnified to fill the page the tables do not loose format and there are hyperlinks to the tables and diagrams included within the text where necessary Unfortunately the plate illustrations have not been included probably to reduce the overall file size however I did not find this to be a problem in following the arguments within the text


13 thoughts on “Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

  1. says:

    I loved this book and the fact that he has applied emperical evidence together with somewhat serendipitous predicting makes

  2. says:

    I spent a whole semester on this book for a class and absolutely loved it100% recommend as a gift to anyone interested in this field

  3. says:

    I suggest this is one of the best narratives on the distant history of mankind highly recommended

  4. says:

    very good book it would be better if the font is bigger

  5. says:

    Excellent book to read

  6. says:

    it opened a new window for me

  7. says:

    Very good thank you i am still enjoying the book the only thing i do find is the download does not include a lot off the pictures

  8. says:

    Look just read it it's worth the effort and explains a lot about the world as we know it

  9. says:

    How this book managed to pass me by for the last 20 years is beyond me but it did and I was much the poorer for it I suspect it was down to the somewhat misleading subtitle Its not a short history of the world it is instead an attempt to explain why some parts of the world developed much uicker than others and ho

  10. says:

    I have only read the introduction and the first chapter but already given upThe book seems to be premised around the notion of the Great Leap Forward However three recent discoveries would seem to seriously call into uestion this notion; Pre Clovis occupation 14550 years ago at the Page Ladson site Florida; U Th dating of carbonate crusts has revealed Neandertal origin of Iberian cave art; a bone fragment from

  11. says:

    Having read Sapiens with its great anthropological history of man I wanted of the same I got this based on other reviews and am disappointed It starts with a man who has obviously been to New Guinea and felt a connection with the people there This connection continues throughout what is an impenetrable book The tiny writing and boring recoun

  12. says:

    Generally the books faults are covered by other reviews and I think bill brysons short history is much accessibleMy chief issue tho

  13. says:

    With apologies to the author whose book I really want to read It just isn’t possible to open this B format ed